Quantum collision: a meeting of science, art, dance and music

Quantum collision: a meeting of science, art, dance and music


It was beautiful, really beautiful. I think it connects you to a different world. A world that does exist, but we can’t see it with our own eyes. It shows that we are of our Universe and in it.
Not just perceiving it as observers. There was a sense of space travel.
There was a sense of ‘where are we?’ It was really extraordinary. Everything in the universe wiggles and jiggles. And you can understand most macroscopic phenomena that you experience in terms of these microscopic wigglings and jigglings. The motivation was to show people that dynamism and change on the microscopic level is happening. This whole interlaced, interlocked, coupled, choreographic dance. It starts with a simulation of some of the most common atoms in the universe. And the equations of motion for these particles. It’s like our best approximation for what stuff does. And then the super computer that’s running the simulation is hooked up to some 3D capture cameras. The 3D capture cameras interpret people’s motion as an energy field perturbation. Literally, in real time, as people move through the space they make the energy in the field flow. They are using the waves that they create in this invisible sea of energy to sculpt the motion of these particles. The physics that’s happening is as close as we could get it to the equations of motion. This is real science. We’ve just beautified it and allowed you to interact with it. We’ve allowed you to step inside, as a person, into the physics and distort the space that these particles are moving through. It’s really what happens on the nano scale. Dave and I started to discuss the idea of trying to analyse the data so that you could identify the particles that were associated with each person. I built some audio tools that were used in the composition so that as each dancer moved around they contributed a unique sound to the sonification of the simulation. Can you take all these things that we’ve discovered and really find that sweet spot. Fine tuning that exploration of the visuals and the sonic soundscape and the particles, which actually means that nobody has more control of the system than each other. The system or the dancers. Everything comes together. Without the science, without the rigour behind that, there wouldn’t be the magic of this system. After the performance you are welcome to come in. And you start to become very tough.
And then you start to move. I was a blob, or I was a line, or I was on fire. You weren’t really an individual person, you were like…. People. You kind of feel self-conscious doing it.
It’s kind of so much fun that you don’t care. I wanted not to have an old body any more. I really wanted it to flow. And then yet, on the screen it lost who I was and just became a beautiful mark. It’s pretty obvious that people are interpreting this on a metaphysical, spiritual level. So I think what that means is that we are starting to be able to raise some of these questions about what is the separation between our self and the environment in which we’re situated. I don’t have answers for it, but everyone thinks about these on some level. But it’s coming from some of the most sophisticated models that we have for understanding the invisible world, that scientists have developed. I find that really satisfying. That we’re posing the questions for people.

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