How To Market and Brand Your Music Career [Part Two] – Hunter Scott – PR & Branding – MUBUTV

How To Market and Brand Your Music Career [Part Two] – Hunter Scott – PR & Branding – MUBUTV


Ritch: �Hunter, so often today we hear how
important it is for an artist to have a story in order to get the attention of the media,
can you explain why that is so important on so many levels? Hunter: �On so many levels, first of all
as a publicist you want to work in, at least that’s our strategy, �work on three different
streams. ��One would be geographical based, so
any members of the band, where you were born, �where you grew up, where you went to school,
where you reside now. �All of those places could be geographically
based publications media outlets, and when I say media outlets blogs, radio and TV that
we can approach. �Number two could be music based, which
is the easiest one, who we think you sound like, who are essentially a rock band, who
are all the music/ rock blogs, magazines, and media outlets that would fit your music
that would want to write about you, and the third one is what we call life style branding
and that is about who you are, what is it about more than just the music. That serves you in the publicity world two
purposes. �Number one there’s less competition. Hunter: ��So if you tell me you like to
collect coins maybe I as a publicist I am going to pitch a story �about what musicians
like to collect on the road while you are on tour, just as an example and then you have
to think how much music to rolling stone gets verses how much music does coin collecting
bloggers get. � Hunter: �So there is a number one is less
competition, number two the person reading that log has a personal connection essentially
to the story to the concept, so probably also a con collector. �So they’re going to go � oh he is like
me� and he is like me translates into the personal connection that we look for, into
the, what we call the conversion rate because nowadays it’s not just enough to get publicity
and so I can get you press in many avenues but how we see that convert into, for instance,
how we see the press convert into Facebook fans and how do we see the facebook fans convert
into people who are actually commenting and on your status updates are liking and sharing
what you’re doing. Hunter: �So essentially �communicating
with you on there. �Then how do you see that convert into the
paying fans because essentially your bottom line is whatever your goals maybe the bottom
line is ninety-nine percent the time you want to make a living doing music. ��You want to quit your day job, you are
making a living doing music, �you have to secure that, you will always be able to do
that so sorry to jump a little bit out of that but that’s essentially how that helps. Hunter: �In terms of defining that brand,
�people who like you for who you are are more likely to purchase the album and not
just the song that they like, they will be more likely to come see you play or not just
come see play, but wear a t-shirt again because they like you for the brand. �So it’s always about taking the band from
band to brand and that’s why essentially where PR and branding are friends, �it’s a big
part of that. Ritch: You lead right into my next question
which is you hear that term so often, and it’s not a term that we have heard in the
previous decades is the word brand, and I want to ask you to expand on that principle,
and you started to address it, why artists need to consider themselves as a brand, why
that is so important in today’s market? Hunter: �because you’re not just going to
be making any money off your music, �it’s a simple as that we’re seeing the labels were
signing new acts and even going to current act and saying please sign a 360 deal. ��Which essentially means we want a piece
of your publishing, your touring, �your future book deal, your acting career, anything
like that. ��Not necessary things �that have to
do directly with the music right now with a CD, but why are they doing that, for one
because they have to because they’re not making enough money off your CDs, because people
are selling less and less music. Hunter: The 360 deal I believe has a really
bad rep, but you have to really think about why they are really doing it. �They’re saying they’re promoting you as
a brand because the music becomes what we call the main product and everything else
is a supplement to your products but even though those are supplements to your products
such as that book deal, or such as touring that’s not supplementing money wise, you are
going to make more money off that but without promoting the music we promote the music as
a means of getting people out to see you. Hunter: �So even if we don’t make money
off this the idea of doing is that you as an indirect way will make more money from
other things, such as what Radiohead did a few years ago with pay whatever you want even
if it’s free. ��Which I constantly have to remind any
person I talk to is when you’re independent band, don’t do that, because they don’t have
to sell any music, don�t devalue the music as well. �So what they did and what major artists
can do is not necessarily what you should be doing and even can afford to do as an independent
artist. Ritch: �Right, prince did the same thing,
by giving away the CD. �But his whole philosophy when he was interviewed
was that person might buy a concert ticket, buy an old album, buy a piece of merchandise,
�it’s selling everything around the music is what the brand is all about. Hunter: �Yeah, and you have to elevate the
value of the brand because for Prince�s album you recognize Prince and you say this
has some sort of value to it. �But if you were to pick up a random CD
on Hollywood Boulevard or any major cities, you have people trying to pass out music once
it’s free it’s like getting a flyer, it has no value to you. You most like will never even listen to it,
you have to remember on that level. �Also with things like RadioHead and what
Prince did, they were the pioneers in doing that so on the publicity side we say they
got a lot press for doing that. �So automatically not only are you an unknown
brand, you�re automatically when you do that you’re not the first one to do it, you’re
not going to get much press for doing it. �There’s also the concept of doing it for
the sake of getting press because you come up with this concept of getting it for free
through whether it’s online or through the Sunday newspaper. Ritch: �Right, let me ask you something. In terms of your approach to marketing and
publicity does the genre dictate the path that you take or the strategy that you will
take in terms of working with the client? ��Are all genres different in terms of
their approach? Hunter: They aren’t, and this is what I always
tell my students to do, it’s a fun thing to do If you go on Wikipedia and you search for
a list of social networking sites you get a list of hundreds of social networking sites. ��Some of them have millions of active
users and you’ve never heard of them. �So the first thing is and it’s kind of
a derivative of the genre and is more where the consumers are at, so for hip-hop you’d
have a different consumer base then for teen pop. �So we have to put yourself in the shoes
of the consumer as a marketing person and say where would my consumer consume my music
and go where they are. Hunter: �These are examples of social networking
sites because if you have someone like teen pop you may want to go for BeBo, which many
people have never heard of. �So we tend to go for Facebook because that’s
where majority people are but a starting point although there are some sites they may want
to focus on, the really hardcore metal sites that we do more for you than Facebook. �Same goes for hip-hop, same goes for teen
pop. So our particular sites, especially if geographically
you�re outside the States, are definitely social networking sites that would do a lot
more for you than Facebook in a sense. So I handle mostly North American markets
they’re definitely going be a lot of stuff outside the US, it’s going to be a beneficial
for you as an artist. Ritch: �Okay to wrap up, what final advice
would you give for artists who are beginning their careers as far as marketing? Hunter: �Always have a goal. I cannot emphasize that enough, have a goal
and remember to promote your product because publicity will take you a certain way but
you have to really see what is it you are going to do. Hunter: �So if I had to give one advice
it would be remembered that distribution does not degrade demand, because people going on
Itunes, you want to create the best product possible you want to put it on iTunes, that
becomes your distribution. But people on iTunes are going for one or
two reasons. �One, they know exactly what they are going
to buy in advance and two they are going to be browsing the charts. �A very small percentage will just go for
the sake of browsing the catalog. So as an independent act you�re not going
to be browsing the charts anytime soon. �So you have to rev back to option number
one and say how are people going to know my product exist. �So it’s not enough to just have that product,
you have to promote it. �People have to know it’s there and maybe
they have heard about it, �hearing it on the radio maybe, they heard an interview with
you on TV, or they start a blog post or maybe it was just a CD review in a magazine and
all those things essentially is what the publicist does and thats our approach at LaFamos, is
to create demand for that product otherwise you�re going to make the best product possible
and no one is ever going to hear it. Ritch: �Okay, Hunter thank you so much for
coming in and doing this, I appreciate it. �

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