First Commissions: Samuel Kreusler, inspired by ‘David’

First Commissions: Samuel Kreusler, inspired by ‘David’


SAM: The reason I started learning guitar was probably because of my dad,
who is a really good jazz guitarist. I remember just being shocked that his fingers
were just creating all of those sounds, doing counter melodies and interacting
with each other as if it’s an orchestra. I loved attempting to play pieces
that were too difficult for me to play and it made me learn a lot
about capabilities and how probably everyone is probably
more capable than they realise. I found all the briefs really interesting
and then we finally got to ours and then I was just thinking I have no idea
what you could possibly do with that. Create a piece of work that represents
a vision of human physical perfection, Esther, Jack, Ash, Danna and Sam. Well, I had no idea
what I could possibly do with that and then I had no idea what anyone
could possibly do with that in relation to music. But then I thought, Django Reinhardt. He lost two of his good
fingers when he was young. Most people would assume that would be the end
of his career or journey as a guitar player, but what he actually did
was use that as an advantage and developed his own techniques
and out of that created a genre. He would often play really difficult
arpeggios and patterns with two fingers. That made me think about
how limitations are important and that maybe perfection is how
someone uses their imperfections rather than what you have to begin with. I thought about the idea of when you take
something away from the guitar, like strings, how can you use that to
extend the guitar beyond. I wanted to explore ways sound,
that wasn’t literally coming from this instrument, could offer something metaphorically about
the way the instrument feels and sounds. So I bought this little device that has,
basically vibrates sound through any object. I’ve been trying to use it and get certain
frequencies through here to um… – To make it resonate.
– Yeah, well, there was that, too. But the other thing was that I wanted to find sounds
that actually worked through this instrument and kind of create a composition
where they become indistinguishable between sound that’s actually coming from
the guitar and what’s being projected through it. Okay, now I’ll go in high pass. Here we go. Dut, dut, dut.
This up a little bit. I’ll get the recording going. Okay. Ah… MAN: Where’s the project at right… Right now? Too much to remember
at the same, ah, okay. I did a lot of freaking out
and throwing ideas away. What happened? You go through a stage of loving it
and being really excited and then maybe two or three days later,
just going, that sounds terrible. And then for some reason last minute,
something comes up I really like. And I have no idea why that works,
it feels like it’s nearly a fluke every time. Usually I just go in
hibernation after that and just have to not focus
on the work or anything. I find it hard to distract myself from it,
I get quite obsessed. I don’t really know how
to block it all out.

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