David Garibaldi: From Outlaw to International Hip Hop Artist

David Garibaldi: From Outlaw to International Hip Hop Artist


>>Announcer: Please direct your
attention to the blank canvas. [ Music playing ]>>David: When I first started in
high school, I wasn’t that focused. I failed a lot of my
classes starting out. I was into graffiti, and you could
find me painting on anything standing up — trains, walls, just a long
list of things I did not own.>>And it wasn’t until my
junior year of high school. I walked into the classroom
of Mr. Sullivan. Mr. Sullivan introduced me to a
new art form called animation. Now, it wasn’t new,
but it was new to me. It was a new tool to use.>>David: Meeting Sullivan, it was
like a switch that just clicked, and he just simply told me that I
didn’t need to create in railyards. I didn’t need to create in back
alleys in the dark in the middle of the night, that I could create
things that people will appreciate, that it can take me places beyond
my neighborhood and the city. So my perspective completely
changed about my art and also what it could do to
change my life and other lives.>>I remember this reporter asking me. So I said, “I call
it Rhythm and Hue.” “How does it work?” I said, “It’s simple. I take some brushes. I line up my paints, my canvas. I turn on the music, and I let
the music paint the portrait.” “And he says, “How
does the crowd react?” I said, “The crowd makes
a lot of noise too.”>>Crowd: [Cheering]>>David: One of the things that
stick out to me that I learned in high school was
how to be tenacious, and I remember Sean Sullivan. He said, “Look up the
word ‘tenacity.'” And I said, “What does that mean?” Tenacity, I had never–
It was like a new sound. I was like, “What language is that?” But I looked it up, and
it was sort of, you know, being tenacious is just not stopping,
you know, always having a momentum and going after the things that
are sort of living in your heart. And that was something
that was brought out of me. That was something that was
taught to me through example. [ Music playing, crowd cheering ]>>When it came to the end of high
school, I couldn’t graduate on time. So now, after high school, I’m living
from place to place, working odd job to odd job, and I was so frustrated. I was living in this little
one-bedroom apartment. I was sitting on the couch, frustrated with the
direction of my life.>>David: And it really
wasn’t until a few years after high school I started employing
the creativity that was living inside of me, but also employing the
tools that were given to me through these art academies
at Sheldon High School. [ Music playing ]>>David: 2003 I started
teaching myself how to paint. I started turning my illustrations
and all these figure drawings that I had been doing in my
animation classes into paintings, and that led to starting to paint
live in jazz clubs and nightclubs and eventually developing into
this performance painting show. So it was– I definitely
took an unconventional path after high school, but I give all the
credit to the tools that I had gained through the art academies
at Sheldon High School. [ Music playing, crowd cheering ]>>Narrator: For more
information about what works in education, go to Edutopia.org.

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