Arts Webinar 2: STEAM – Creative Art Maker Stations (Grades 6-12)

Arts Webinar 2: STEAM – Creative Art Maker Stations (Grades 6-12)


Welcome to the second session of the Connecticut
state arts standards webinars. I’m Cindy Parsons. I’m hosting today’s session. We are excited
today to have our STEAM webinar presented by Laurel Archambault from Simsbury Public
Schools. Laurel will be presenting for about 45 minutes to an hour and hopefully you’re
able to see a chat, at a live chat box on the screen. If you do not, see if you can
find that, and you’re welcome to add any questions or comments during the presentation. We will
try to get to all your questions and comments after her presentation ends. We’ll continue
with a question-answer session. Laurel is an artist and a visual art educator teacher
who teaches at Henry James Middle School in Simsbury. She’s been a teacher since 1995
and has been at the middle school that long. She’s been working with her district and with
her school to start working with STEAM units in the art room and is often been a team mentor
and a master mentor for Simsbury Public Schools. She’s on the unified arts team leader, she’s
on leadership team, and she’s also serves on the State Department of Education committees
attending a curriculum work and in summer institute work. So Laurel, I’m going to turn
it over to you now and hopefully we’ll have some great responses and some questions. [LAUREL]
Excellent, thank you Cindy Parsons. Wonderful introduction. Welcome everybody to the webinar
for STEAM Creative Art Stations. Very excited to introduce this to you and just a couple
little things to intro as we go through the first few slides. As Cindy went over my name
is Laurel Archambault, and I’ve been here at Simsbury for 21 years. Can’t believe it’s
been that long. My contact info is here and you can certainly, you know, access this later
and get a hold of me if you have any specific questions, too, if we don’t answer them at
the end. Webinar overview. There’s a few things were going to go over as far as the reasons
for connecting to STEAM and how I got started in doing that, the setup of my room, and the
the layout, the different stations that I offer the students as we go through the STEAM
process. Example handouts I’m going to show you that – through the slides. How students
are assessed within their work and how they they go through that process. Also connecting
to various standards. I’m going to connect to the National Core Visual Arts Standards,
which are also now adopted as the Connecticut visual arts standards. I also touch on content
area standard I’ll get into that a little bit more detail later. And Common Core standards
in both math and in reading and writing. In the final area it’s kind of a reflection of
what I would change and how I’d improve the actual webinar to be the actual process of
the STEAM stations themselves. All right so the first thing reasons for connecting to
STEAM. First of all STEAM is the integration of science, technology, engineering, art,
and math, and honestly we’ve been doing this for years in the art classroom, so I just
thought of such a natural thing to do. I joined the STEM committee here, which I keep staying,
oh it’s a STEAM committee. Where’s the arts? And they’re, like, oh yeah, because I would
always show my connections. Sorry, our bell just rang. In art class, I was basically integrating
STEAM concepts anyway, so in doing so, there are certain areas that I would make those
connections also. That’s in a later slide. I just mentioned how we have a STEAM committee,
so they were taking on a STEM model in our school, where the science classrooms were
going to be expanded. They’re also going to expand our library to make it more of a maker
station area as well within the library. And so we include that in our classroom. So try
to do our best to kind of really inform them in the area of STEAM, and I think the high
schools really adopted a STEAM concept as well, so kind of pushing that in our school
here. What I was already doing. So some of the areas that we were already working on
in our classroom because I had a few stations already available included architecture, so
you can see the student right over here doing a great job using Kiva planks, and I’lll go
much more in detail when we show that slide for you. A 3D pen design was a couple stations
that I would have for students as well, so if they finish a work of art early they would
go to these stations and work on those, and also stop-motion animation, where they actually
have to have a little time where they plan for the animation and then they would actually
be able to produce it using our iPads. So, I’m sorry did you have a question? Okay though
there was a background question there. What I was already doing. We had Artsonia that
we’ve been working with. So with Artsonia we actually load artwork onto an online exhibition
website. So this is what we do with all of our students, seventh grade and eighth grade
and in seventh grade we teach them in that process they are able to load their own artwork,
which is a great connection already to the presenting for the national arts standard.
Many things that they do with that: compare/contrast, how technologies have changed the way our
preserved and presented is experienced, and also based on criteria, analyze, evaluate
methods for preparing and presenting art. They had to get to the point of presenting
their own work when they did that. So we teach them that whole process with the Artsonia.
You can see down here, they’re actually in the process of doing that. We have a QR code
that they use the iPad and they load in to that I’ve to go to the Artsonia site. We use
background paper because you had a student that had done an architectural design. He’s
holding a backdrop for that so it’s just a really nice background. They have to understand
proper presentation of their work. And then the student right now is taking a photo using
the iPad, and then he loads, and he can crop on and change that. And that is done for every
work of art they create so we have an ongoing portfolio of their work, which was very helpful
for this whole STEAM station process. There’s actually a link right here. I would try to
click on it but I’m not sure to the work for us through the webinar. I can show certainly
share that with people if they’d like to see that. I want to expand this to include all
STEAM areas with choices, so two activities per content area, for science, for technology,
and engineering and math that obviously have art as a focus for each one. I was not connected
to having all STEAM included in each station, so they didn’t have to have all of those areas
for each station I was working on. They had to have the content area and then the art,
and understand explain how that worked. However, some kids would expand much more than that
and be able to explain many STEAM connections. I also knew they can make more connections
later when they explain their STEAM areas, so we’ll talk about that a future slide as
well. Here is the beginning setup that I was kind of, created this cart to align with what
the students were doing in the classroom. You can see the stations are aligned with
1 through 8 on here so my first station, I had an area out in the room that had a poster
that described the process of what they were going to do. Right here, number one would
correlate with that. They might have handouts or things they might need here on this cart
and then work at the station so you could say it’s all the way up through 8. Each area
would contain that. So some items were found at the station, some items were right at this
cart that they might need to use, like 3D pens I kind of house right here just because
I didn’t want kids just to use them without having gone through the planning process first.
Oops, little mouse is at work I’m sorry. All right. Now here’s where I have an integrated
a few photos of students actually in the process or where you can kind of see the room layout.
You’re going to see this process a little later, but some stations could be completed
like I said, at the table, and I’ll kind of show you the table area. And then here you
kind of see in the back section of the room, where we had animation and some students working
on 3D pens. Use little 3D pens in a different view. And the rest of the room you’ll kind
of see in this little video. So I’m going to attempt to play this. Let’s hope that this
works without any question. [VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] [LAUREL] So here’s some students working at
the tables in the process. She’s doing the second portion. I’ll show you the marbling
later. Now we’re going over to where the pottery bowls are. [LAUREL’S VOICE ON VIDEO] Don’t
give me an evil look. [LAUREL] Kids are funny. [LAUREL’S VOICE ON VIDEO] (Unintelligible)
mark your, your colors. Does that make a difference too? Why is it cool? What did you do that
you think was so cool about it? (Unintelligible) No pressure there. He could never mess up.
[VIDEO CLIP ENDS] [LAUREL] So in that one you kind of saw a little close up of them,
and probably one of the next clips I’ll show you where a student is working on the pottery
wheel, but I just want to show you the layout of the room. You saw me looking at the tables
first and then kind of walking across the room to the pottery wheels. So my room is
well spread out. I did have little station area set up and I’ll show you something right
back here you can actually see a board to the, for 3D pen design. This number right
here is the number that correlates on the cart that I was talking about before and there’s
some images here, also directions, most likely I had the content standards on there as well
for the area that they focused on. Okay? Okay room layout. Each of the stations had a board
with a description like I just showed you. This one I didn’t have a number on here yet
when she first started this one, but I did and connect that later. It explained a process,
the connections. You can see here, this is the next gen science standards that are connected
to what they were doing for marbling. And then I also had a PowerPoint running in the
room that would continuously loop to talk about each of the areas and give those directions
as well. So they had multiple ways of seeing the directions as well as a handout that had
two pages that also had the directions of process on there for them so they were if
they, you know, were a visual learner they can kind of look at it. They were also able
to learn from each other so it was very nice. Here are the stations that I had and like
I said I’ll go through each of them just you can get more in-depth understanding. For science,
I had centrifugal force and marbling surface tension so in centrifugal force you saw when
I went to that pottery wheel. Technology. Stop-motion animation. Machine drawing. And
then engineering is architecture and the 3D pen design. And in math we did a kaleidocycle,
a very cool thing, and grid drawing. Okay, so as we get to these stations you’re going
to see like I said a few videos. This one looks familiar very similar to the one you
just saw before. For the scientific centrifugal force, it was a lot about color mixing. We
talked about how those colors with mix, scientifically what happens when colors mix visually. Newton’s
laws of motion, especially centrifugal force itself. They really had the students hypothesize.
They would hypothesize first, do a couple little things that they write about, experimental
a little with different variables, like the amount of water, the speed of the wheel, the
use of marker and water and how that would interact, and down here you can see a couple
final results where they had a great color mixing. She really wanted to use the warmer
colors. This just happened to use the cooler colors and how they mixed together. A student
could choose to create a mandala-like design at the end if they live had a little extra
time and they were able to do. They had to actually all use a little cutout first to
practice on, then they went on to a larger version. This was about 10 inches in size.
You can see her on the second version right here so we’ll take a little look at the clip [VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] so we talked
about how to place it in the center and to work on alignment. That one student who was
in the corner did not, you know, look at the distance around being parallel all the way
around to make sure the radial effect would work as well. You can tell it’s highly motivating
they were so excited to be on the pottery wheels, then using the paint, playing with
it, experimenting. The only hard part I think is is having a place to write because they
would be in the process of doing it and they’d have to stop. They had to just jot down note
for themselves so sometimes that was a little difficult to work through, but we figured
it out. Here’s a second station. This is the marbling surface tension. So we work with
properties of matter and the surface tension and how, there’s actually chalk that we’re
using that floats on the surface, I’ll have the student actually describe this process
you a little more. The effects of light and how the human eye sees in silhouette. So we
worked with these two scientific concepts. Right here you can actually see the process
of its floating. They would put multiple colors in. Like I said, you can see the student in
progress too, but here’s some final versions of what the students would do. So plans for
that and also that secondary process earlier in that video you saw at the tables where
she was cutting out her silhouettes. So let’s take a look at this little video. [VIDEO CLIP
PLAYS] [LAUREL’S VOICE ON VIDEO CLIP] Can you explain the process? [STUDENT ON VIDEO
CLIP] Take a knife, and scrape a lot of the chalk onto water. And you create the friction.
And then you take a piece of paper onto the water there and the colors show up in a pretty
way. [LAUREL’S VOICE ON VIDEO CLIP] Excellent, yep. Marble-y kind of a way. Very good. How
to you get more marbling? What’s the marbling effect? How do you do that? [STUDENT] (Unintelligible)
You take the back of a paint brush and then swirl it a little. [LAUREL’S VOICE ON VIDEO
CLIP] Awesome. You did a really nice job. Wheres’s, your piece is right there. Yeah,
it’s drying. [VIDEO CLIP ENDS] [LAUREL] You can see that Avery was in the process of actually
doing the chalk portion and it was not putting the paper on yet but they had to do each step
in a very cautious way. If he’s put the paper in wrong it wouldn’t, it wouldn’t connect
to the chalk in the right way. Some people would submerge it all the way and then the
chalk wouldn’t show up. So sometimes there’s some trial and error, which is a lot of fun
during the station so it was great for them to go through that trial and error process.
Once a student got it they would often teach another student that process as well until
the next station. Third station is technology, the stop-motion animation students use an
iPad and iStopMotion app, which I found, I love it because it does show a a ghost image
where they last place whatever object they are moving and so you could see the ghost
image move a little bit and then retake a photo. The majority of these, the two that
you’re going to see for videos that students made probably had at least 150 actual individual
photos when they were taking these. So a lot of fun. The process for planning on this one
was a little more extensive. They had to do a little worksheet where they had a storyboard
and design storyline. They designed all those sets and objects in some cases for this. Some
are much more ornate than others. So I will show you some of those. Here’s the planning
with two since they wanted to work together, which I had no problem with if they wanted
to work with a buddy. [VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] (Children talking) [VIDEO CLIP ENDS] [LAUREL] They were
just working together on an idea, so then they came up with this is the one they actually
created down here. You’ll see the little video. [STOP MOTION ANIMATION VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] [LAUREL]
Hopefully the videos flow for you smoothly. Two simple little videos. I wish, you know,
we’re going to, I think the next thing we’ll start working on is getting a voiceover or
they’re going to add music. I was talking to the music tech person at our school and
she’s very interested in doing some background music that they could associate with these,
so we were talking a little about that. So maybe it’s gonna be nice little connection
there next year. Another student example. [STOP MOTION VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] [LAUREL] they
could bring things in that they could use if they so chose. This student wanted to draw
and have, you know, objects going through, so very cute how those two students decided
to do their work.[STOP MOTION VIDEO CLIP ENDS] [LAUREL] okay the technology station from
the machine drawing, a lot of fun. I have to say this one was funny. The kids really
enjoy this because it was just there’s no pressure on the final design being something
beautiful. It was just them creating and what was it they are creating with a machine, and
how did they get that machine to actually draw. How they make that happen? Excuse me.
So the students had to create an abstract drawing by using a machine. They experimented
with multiple machines, including a remote-control bug and a pull and go car, so we do have a
whole video the bug in motion. [VIDEO CLIP OF REMOTE CONTROL BUG PLAYS] [LAUREL] so you
can see how much he enjoyed that. It was a lot of fun, and like I said they would do
multiple things then come up their final design. You kind of had to experiment first to see
what was working for you, if you like the straighter lines, the curvy lines, you wanted
a mix, so it was just a lot of fun to experiment with that one. All right, engineering, which
is the architecture. Students had to design and construct a building out of using Keva
Planks, which are great. They do not connect. You don’t glue them together or anything.
They’re reusable. They’re freestanding designs, which are not attached but they must be able
to balance, to stay in place, which is key. This student puts it so eloquently so hopefully
you can hear this video well. [VIDEO CLIP OF STUDENT BUILDING WITH KEVA PLANKS PLAYS]
[LAUREL ON VIDEO] So what are you constructing? [STUDENT ON VIDEO] I wasn’t quite decided.
It was going to be either, like, a house or a castle. It was going to be, like, one of
them. But I’m not sure which one yet. [LAUREL ON VIDEO] What did you find difficult in engineering
your piece so far? [STUDENT] Just like (unintelligible) balance (unintelligible) [LAUREL ON VIDEO]
Yeah. Yep. Very nice. You have a few different ways (unintelligible) Those little spirals
are, did you have a hard time the spiral function? [STUDENT] No, because if you can keep the
weight in the center then you can like [LAUREL ON VIDEO] It’ll balance it out, yeah. Very
nice. Beautiful job. Awesome work. [VIDEO CLIP OF STUDENT BUILDING WITH KEVA PLANKS
ENDS] [LAUREL] Yeah, very nice. This is her finished version of that. I love how she talked
about the weight in the center. So meaningful and really important for what they did and
I don’t know if you heard in the background, there’s a lot of background noise on that
one, where a student was actually using the Keva Planks at a different location and theirs
fell because their balance was not quite on. So sometimes its’ experimenting with what’s
going to actually work and how is it going to stand. You can see some other beautiful
examples by students through this process. So just an amazing, I really love to Keva
blocks. Great for the architectural structure, especially the fact that it’s not permanent,
and they use the photo to keep these. What I do is I will actually print the photos and
put that in our art show when we have our art show time. The stations for engineering
at the 3D pen. This is the number six station. Just great final results and we do a lot of
trial and error with 3D pens. The first year we started using these and that’s why I said
the beginning of the year I kind of started out with what’s playing with this, I think
maybe the end of last year we brought them in, but students had to plan and design something
using the 3D pen and filament and just to warn you always use a PLA, which is an organic
plant based filament rather than the ABS. ABS is very bad for you to breathe into unless
you’re in a very well ventilated area. Please use the PLA. So it’s the size we always order.
They could choose to make a relief or a sculpture-in-the-round but they had to make sure it was secure in
their engineering of the design. So you can look at these final versions. This was actually,
is just a flat relief form. These two are very freestanding. You can see that some are
made kind of a cube design. I’m going to let let you take a look Harper and work. [VIDEO
CLIP OF 3D PEN DESIGN PLAYS] [LAUREL] So when you saw Harper in process, she is working
on waxed paper, which we found really the best way to work with this if you’re going
to kind of sketch out a flat design first and then work from that. I had some students
that wanted something more curb so I actually would work on a ceramic piece. Sometimes we
put the wax paper over it you could kind of form that curve. It’s a little tough to work
when people just, I don’t know if you’ve ever seen a maybe a commercial with 3D pens where
they kind of pull it up and it stays straight, you can do that but it takes a lot of time
and you really have to support the piece. When Harper was working down here you saw
her kind of touch it after. It does, cools off very quickly so as she was touching it
was already pretty much cool in that area. You cannot touch the tip. That’s the biggest
thing. It gets to 200 degrees, so we do talk a lot about safety with that process, but
just you can see some really amazing results as long as you really think through what you
want to construct before you begin constructing. Math: the kaleidoscycle. This one, a lot of
fun. Kids have a hard time because they have to be so precise. So students would create
a hexagonal kaleidocycle. Number of faces is 24. The number of edges the 30. The number
of vertices is 12. It is 6 tetrahedra that are put together, so again all these math
terms that we’re talking about, all these geometric forms that need to work in process
together to make this infinitely turn. They use a separate paper template to design using
similar colors as it went across in a diamond formation, and then they need to fold very
accurately so some kids of course found the folding a little tricky. So I’ll let you see
this in action where it spins. [KALEIDOCYCLE VIDEO CLIP PLAYS] [LAUREL] these kids, aren’t
they cute? You can hear there’s an announcement on there as well at the same time, but you
can see how you can just continually like turn it around it’ll continue to do that infinitely,
but beautiful final design. The more intricate they made the structures or it they wanted
to kind of connect something they could, so as kids get a little more advanced in this
they might even make a character in the center that would come together, so just a lot of
fun to play with and learning their math, of course. And then one of the final stations
is the math, which is a grid drawing. Using math to demonstrate proportion and ratio by
enlarging the drawing with accuracy, so you can see some final versions here, how the
student used the grid, placing it, getting the right proper size, by the paper. They
actually had to find the correct paper themselves. I told them where paper sizes were. They had
to multiply and decide where that would be, which paper is the right one to use, and then
doing a grid drawing. You can see him in the process over here with the grid down here
and I will show you a little video of a student in progress. [VIDEO CLIP OF GRID DRAWING PLAYS]
[LAUREL ON VIDEO] can you do a little description of what you you’re, what you did to create
this? [STUDENT ON VIDEO] I made this grid bigger and I started, like, drawing the bird
to, like, match up with the lines on the grid. [LAUREL ON VIDEO] How did you do the transition
from the grid to the larger grid? What was the difference there? Mathematically, what
did you have to do? [STUDENT] Like, I wouldn’t have to, like, measure like with the ruler
and stuff to see where it is. Like, you would look at the lines you put the grid on. [LAUREL
ON VIDEO] Right what size are these boxes with (unintelligible) those boxes? [STUDENT]
4 by 6. And this is, uh, (unintelligible) so 12 by 8. [LAUREL ON VIDEO] Right and so
you had to do it like 3 inches on that 1 and then 1 inch on the other. Your ratio and proportions
have to change. That’s awesome. Can you hold up your bird for one second? Ooo. Hold up
the little one too next to it. Beautiful job. Good. And you worked with what area of the
STEAM component for this one? [STUDENT] Math. [LAUREL ON VIDEO] Very good! Mathematical.
Nice job. [VIDEO CLIP OF GRID DRAWING ENDS] [LAUREL] she was that one. You can see her
in the background she’s actually loading one of her works of art on Artsonia at the time
while she was talking about her work, but just a great process and an interesting way
for them to learn math. They were so excited when they would draw a large one so they could
see how accurate it was. They started just using this in the classroom too in a different
project. They would actually say can I make my animal bigger by using the evidence? Of
course you can use the grid to do that. So it’s like they’re taking that and applying
it of course. Okay into the next section we’re going to talk about is documenting the work
and the handouts that we used for this process. So once a station was complete all students
must document their work and loaded on Artsonia like I talked about before. We had photo stations
available for students to take the digital photo of three-dimensional work and then if
it’s two-dimensional they would just lay it flat and then take their photo directly above,
so I actually teach that process. They take nice photos for what they are creating, so
they are as accurate to what they look like in person. You can see right here there’s
a student is loading one that she did for the centrifugal force design over here. He
had done the marbling. This is when he’s loading on right now. They’re able to make a title
and they’re also able to include like a written description about their work as well for this
process. Alright, so in this part for the document thing in the handout we went into
the computer lab as a whole group when we were getting towards the end of this. Not
everybody was totally finished with this process, but they went into Google Classroom and they
pasted their Artsonia images into the corresponding content area where they focused on, so they
explained the STEAM connections and my wonderful supervisor came up with the idea, well I’ll
just have the letter as S-T-E-A-M and they can explain whichever ones they connect with.
I’m like, oh my gosh, that’s a great idea. So in the Google Classroom form that they
had to fill out that’s what I did. I had this exact layout right here where they have S,
T, E, A and M and they would put those connections in. Now if they had a science connection they
would use the S and then the A because they had to have, you know, I had to have the content
area and they had to have art for every you know area. However some kids would see connections
in different areas as well, so they would include any STEAM connection. Some students
would find five and, you know, in each station, so it’s pretty amazing to see their connections
they were building and making, so here’s the one way they get inserted that piece, and
then he’s in Google Classroom just writing his answers. You could see the STEAM is right
here. So by describing the process, art work demonstrates the STEAM focus. So just as a
really great way to have me understand that they knew what they were talking about is
they to each of the stations and the more they did a different station for different
content area the more they are like, oh my gosh, hey this this applies over here too
so they would see a connection in math and also in engineering and they would talk about
what those connections would be, so it’s just really great to see the multiple connections
they were making as they did this. Alright, so here’s an example a student, oh, yes, a
very highly phenomenal student, I must say, not all students would do all eight stations,
and the reason for that is you know it’s timing they had to make sure that they got one from
science, that they had one station from technology, one from math, and one from engineering, and
of course art was always integrated, so this student named Sarah would do it. She did every
connection in some of these. Maybe not all of them but how amazing is it to see these
connections she made for every content area of STEAM when she was doing the centrifugal
force and how those connections were made and here she has you know three of the five.
Same with this one. She had five of the five, so it’s great to see that they connected a
much more than just the content area I had stated, especially through our discussions
are talking with other students. So a lot of fun to see that final result with what
they had done, and they were amazed by the connections. Then of course our other other
products we did we were doing a sculpture unit shortly after this, and they were, like,
oh hey, this is a math connection right here because da da da da. If not they would all
they would talk about those connections for the technology they talk about how technology
the connection for every unit we do because we take a photograph of every piece that we
do, so great to see that they’re making those connections not only during our STEAM unit
but in every unit really start to do, which is a lot of fun. All right documenting the
work here is kind of the first unit they were given. They had to sort of plan this with,
they had it, I would talk about each of the stations so it’s handed out to them before
we started anything. They decided which stations they want to begin. They had to have one from
science they would start with, one from technology, one from engineering, and one from math, so
they had to select ahead of time. They could always change their mind. I had no problem
with that, but they had to have minimum of at least four because they had to hit every
content area, and then I would say most kids did about six stations. I did have quite a
few kids that did eight total. Very few that only did four so it was to have a little time
to kind of get around to each station. Excuse me. They observed me doing demonstrations
a station and of course because time would by they might get a little rusty, but I had
my running PowerPoint and I also had students that would teach each other, so one student
at the station kind of finishing up, they would show the next student coming over, especially
at the 3D pens, especially at the centrifugal force station because some of those are create
kind of high tech, and they would have to really understand that if they forgetting
from before the student before them would demonstrate that process. They were kind of
just observe for a little bit to understand. Okay, so how students were steps assessed
through the process. I constantly supervise and discuss the design process and the creative
process of the students while they participate in the station’s. Content connection, you
know, connections for each area where folks in each station as well. I could also see
where they were because I would check Artsonia and see what stage. I had, you know, three
different classes doing this at one time so it was a lot of different works of art that
were kind of being produced, so it’s nice for me to be able to go into Artsonia and
in Artsonia when you do this student loading, the teacher can go in and that you have to
be the one that allows it to be loaded onto Artsonia before it shows up, so that way I
can check the title make sure it’s spelled correctly, making sure the content and their
written descriptions are appropriate, and so I was going to do that and also besides
a crop or whatever, so I could see what they had been putting into Artsonia to know later
what was going in the Google Classroom, then also checking through Google classroom. I
also had to do this demonstrate and teach each other, so in the process of them teaching
I saw their accuracy. I was kind of see their process first before they were teaching somebody
else, and it’s great to see them reinforce their knowledge and help others, so like I
said students had a minimum four stations that they had to complete before they were
completely done with this, and it’s like I said it that excess time a lot of kids wanted
to try to get to all eight stations. That was great. I have a little extra time offer
so they’re kind of a little bit lagging behind other students, they could certainly come
down and during their homerooms and we have a little time or study hall type let’s do
that open for them to do it anytime, so it’s a great way. I had quite a few like I said
they got all eight stations done. Here’s how students are assessed in the summative manner.
So once students completed the Google classroom the photo book documentation of scene description
they submit to me the summative assessment, so this is a common assessment. Now we don’t
necessarily all do the stations yet this one new that we’ve kind of developed this year
and I’ve been working on, but we have been working on STEAM as a unit so I used to do
two so one unit where they would work on something that was STEAM related, so this assessment,
the summative assessment has to cover not only doing stations but also doing an individual
kind of project that talks about steam, so we made it open enough where you could do
that but also hit on all the areas that are really important to you either doing stations
or doing your unit. So here, you know, having the planning and or the process, so for me
was much more about the process. Their planning for this one was much more about, I think
I’m going to do this station first or this one first. I’ll let you show me this and in
a different unit I might have a whole planning worksheet where they have to go through, so
we can assess that either way we’d love to open up where they can do that. Creativity,
originality, expression and written description of the theme concepts. Really important at
the end of any unit that we do that they are able to understand those concepts, that they
get, you know, that it’s science, technology, engineering, art, and math and that they can
verbalize that to us and really demonstrate that understanding, not only through written
work but also through their design itself. Media and craftsmanship, always important.
You know even though we were very experimental here, I still wanted to see that they took
their time, that they thought about, they explored, they got to the final process, so
they would do some planning. For example, centrifugal force where they would work on
little bitty versions first and then say okay now I know what I want to do. I want these
colors to mix because they mix better or whatever their process might be for that. And then
of course focus effort in the art work that they do. Being on task, they are doing the
right thing, you know sometimes with stations you can get kids that get so excited and they
want to run around, so that kind of focus was really important. Okay so here is connecting
to the standards. This is the big thing but, you know, because we had so much we were offering
with these stations I found that I expected to so many standards it was awesome. Certain
one might stand out more than others, but for the comment you know the National Core
Visual Art Standards are also the Connecticut Standards at this point. We had multiple ones
in creating that we touched on. I don’t need to go want you know walking through each one
of these but I think it’s especially the applying to you know overcoming creative blocks. This
one you’re really are experimenting, really getting through the process of understanding
what this is, seeing some other students and what they’ve come, and then what is your process
in doing so, especially demonstrating persistence in developing the skills with various materials.
I’m huge in this one, so you can see that there’s a lot in the creating component. Responding
also. Interpreting, analyzing art, making approaches, they really had to explain their
STEAM connection, so that was huge. Right here as a presenting we talked all about Artsonia
and how they presented their work and then also popping it into Google Classroom and
talking about those STEAM connections through the S, T, E, A, and M. And the final one connecting,
so here’s those big connections as well even through their presenting but also by connecting
itself, especially connected to our other content areas which was just huge in this.
I was talking to our science teacher here I’m hoping he says, like, oh we have a few
microscopes right here (unintelligible) high-powered. Like I would love to take that because how
cool would it be to integrate, you know, students looking at a microscope and then they get
like really exaggerating the size of say I don’t know a pine cone and how does that look
up close and how would you sketch that? So we talked a lot about some other scientific
connections and those connections are just amazing. All right connecting to the standards.
Here these are coming into the content area standard, not something you have to do in
your art classroom if you’re an art teacher but like I wanted to do here especially to
really push that whole theme concept in our our STEM school because it’s such a huge,
there’s so many huge connections that were made especially you know the Next Gen Science
Standards, I’m pretty on top of what they were doing and they’re just kind of starting
that in our school anyway, so it’s amazing, you know, kind of connections here with that,
so especially the Earth systems. We talked so much about, you know, like how water works
and that surface tension. You know, so many things. Planning out and carrying out investigations
is exactly what we were doing the experimental, you know, process how they go through, how
they investigate something, the hypothesis they would make, so just so many connections
with this especially with centrifugal force and the marbling. All right, connected standards
here. This one is I had funny because I had a little bit of a harder time finding the
way to get to the edge of the tech ed connections and the engineering, but I found this to be
the most associated with the design process because we are so aligned with that design
process. They use an engineering technology and in tech ed, so very similar in art, so
quite a few areas were touched with the stop motion animation, the machine drawing, architecture,
3D pen design, all very strongly relate to these content area standards. Okay, you can
see some nice other, here’s a 3D pen design another another Keva point design that we
did for architecture. Alright, so here are some Common Core Standards for the math. Solve
problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths
and areas from scale drawing and reproducing scale, how how great is that compared to this
ratio design where they did the proportions and they had to make it larger. It’s like
fits exactly so the geometry there, and then drawing the freehand with a ruler or protractor.
Geometric shapes given conditions, so we’ve talked about the use of the kaleidoscycle
and how it had to be so specific and those angles had to be exact, so it’s just great,
and the students had that knowledge they brought in math already so they were the ones telling
me about the angles, which is wonderful. Ratio in proportion again, so that connects right
down here with our ratio of portion with a grid drawing, so just some amazing connections
to the math standards. Here the ELA and writing. Writing arguments to support the claims, the
clear reasons and relevant evidence. They had to exactly do that when they are putting
their work into Google Classroom and tell me how they connected to every area of S-T-E-A-M
for steam, so just amazing, so having to have a logical reason, evidence accurate things
they’re showing, so they actually had visual examples to support that, so quite amazing
to have those connections. All right. Reflection. So as I look over, you know, what I had done
during that whole quarter with working these different stations, certain things I would
change and improve. We actually did the rubric revision, so the rubric that you’re seeing
right there was the revision we made kind of toward the end of what I was doing with
my students. We had it a little too closed in on having to have a real specific planning
before you would create and that didn’t really work for the station because it’s much more
experimental and exploratory, so we made sure that (unintelligible) really showed that it
could go either way, so we kind of put a planning out, or you had experimentation going on,
so we want to make it flexible enough to really show that. So my coworker Christie Foley did
an amazing unit. She loved the whole centrifugal force, so in doing so she did a unit where
it was just one thing with their final version. You can see how incredible the final version
of this is with the detailed designs and they did a much more math connected, so they had
science and math was only their big concepts, well, and of course art, so she did a mandala
unit based on that. Huge PowerPoint talked about the history of the mandala and then
had the students experiment on the pottery wheel in the same way talking about some centrifugal
force, and then she did a lot with measuring and laying out the design with measurement
and all of that for the math concepts, so her final residing to this little version
over here, just beautiful and all of them just gorgeous, so hers was much more one unit
that she focused on but going through the same process. What’s great is that after she
finished that she had some stations that up just like I did where they would go work at
stations what they finished that unit. Excuse me. So in the technology category I would
keep a stop-motion animation. That’s fantastic. Had a great little planning unit they had
to do ahead of time. The machine drawing I enjoy but I think I would change it up a little
bit because there so we have at we have five iPads in the art room now and so many apps
that are just our apps are incredible out there so I think I would research a little
bit more about different apps that would work well and integrate that, especially ones that
matched the STEAM concept so it is a matter of research over the summer. I think that’s
going to be when I sort of upgrade or offer three different areas, so I don’t definitely
have to stick to just two. It depends on how many stations I want to have, so it does get
a little bit, it could be a little too much to try to handle more than that, so I might
either have to decide okay do I want to get rid of the (unintelligible) machine or have
that at a different date, but I did like the considerably playing with the iPads in the
apps because there’s so much available out there and it would really fit with that, especially
the videos. I’m starting to get into the voice into a video and that sort of thing, so we’ll
look into that more. So one of the things I would change or how I can improve. For the
math component, I considered taking the math section separate, so I actually try that out
this quarter because I have different quarters of students in my middle school. Last quarter
I had them do all eight stations at the same time and kind of do that rotation. This quarter
I actually had them do the math component which was great because I was able to kind
of demonstrate the process while we go through all the stations and they had a choice of
the two different math components, so I let them have their choice ahead of time then
I also showed them the process of how we go into Google Classroom and load that in after
using Artsonia, so it’s kind of teaching them the whole Artsonia process, so they can load
a little easier so I didn’t necessarily have to take them all in the computer room or a
computer lab to do that process. They could kind of do it all in the classroom, so I did
enjoy having the math stations first, and then I’m gonna do the other six stations later.
I think it’ll give them the opportunity to hit more stations if they weren’t able to
before and minimize too many choices where some students get like, okay, I’m done. I
want them to stay focused. They are very motivated usually through the duration of this as they
get towards the end of the day. It’s about two weeks that it takes for this process,
and as they get towards the end sometimes they sort of burn out a little bit, certain
students, definitely not all of them. So I liked introducing the entire STEAM concept
that they kind of started out with the math station idea, talked about the whole STEAM
concept so throughout the core they can make more connections as they do other projects
as well because there’s, again, there’s so many connections and art that it’s nice to
have them connect throughout the whole process or through this quarter. Excuse me. So once
they complete their math station like I said they went on the Artsonia and Google and we
did that process already this quarter, so it’s nice for them to see that and now they
can just, now when we go into the actual stations themselves they’re going to just apply themselves.
They’re you know what I’ll just do a little refresher and I’ll be much easier I think
to to load that. All right well perfect timing was about 45 minutes so I have questions at
this point so if anyone has a question that they would like to ask, fantastic. [CINDY
PARSONS] Let’s see here. Allison, are you going to unmute people or should I just read
some questions that they posted? [ALLISON] Why don’t we start with the, how many people?
There’s five? We could probably unmute. Okay, well, so let me let me do that. Welcome to
the party everyone. Hi. [CINDY] Welcome everybody. Eileen Schneider, you had a question for Laurel
a few minutes ago. I don’t know if you want to. [EILEEN SCHNEIDER] Yeah, I missed the
first part. Can you hear me? [LAUREL] Yeah, hi Eileen. [EILEEN] Oh good. Hey, how you
doing? I missed the first bit, just I was having a little trouble with my, yeah, this
is just a two week? [LAUREL] Yeah, these stations last over a duration of two, two and a half
weeks, but yeah, they don’t have to hit every station, so they have to hit one station from
every content area, so at least four stations, but yeah, it’s a two-week duration, so it’s
a very experimental, go to each station try them out. I understand that my two weeks is
a little different than most people. When I do my, my students work, we have, I have
some that are finishing and then they’ll start the station’s after I’ve done with the demos
and other students would be finishing up a work of art, so this two weeks kind of spans.
It’ll span over two and a half three weeks sometimes depending on the student itself.
[EILEEN] So you actually take it you actually take a day to just do demos on each thing
or do you have little videos that they play to get [LAUREL] Multiple things. I did I had
a PowerPoint that’s running, so when I do a demonstration on certain ones, yeah, I kind
of break them up I sort of like would talk about math. Okay for the math ones, we’re
going to do this and that’s why I kind of started, this quarter I did the math first
like I almost did it like separate from the whole station thing, so they’ve done the math
now at this point and they understand the station process later but they understood
how to load it and how to put it into our Artsonia and Google Classroom and all of that,
so I kind of did that ahead of time. So they had to choose one of them to math they could
do. They had to create it. We went through the process. That way I demonstrated those
so it will be a little easier for the demonstration because you’re right it took a while, the
demonstrating process. I don’t go into a lot of depth because I want them to really experiment,
so the key is that they experiment and then would start teaching each other. [CINDY] Laurel
you see your students every day. [LAUREL] I do. I see them every day and for 45 days.
Yep. [EILEEN] Now in, in my school as soon as you say math people shut down. Are you
not having that experience? [LAUREL] no, they were so excited about the math one actually.
When I showed my kaleidocycle before I will even talk about it, they were, like, oh my
gosh! how do you do that? Because I had one that was finished and I was just twisting.
That’s so cool! and then other kids that were really into drawing love the ratio, so I probably
had almost a half and a half where some chose the kaleidocycle and some chose the grid drawing.
I demonstrated both and I said your choice is up to you. I mean, I didn’t care if they
all wanted to do kaleidocycles. That was fine with me, but I gave them the option so that
was, it was pretty cool, but they were pretty excited. Again we’re middle school. Your high
school and maybe a little bit of a difference there, too, but, yeah, hey, you know, you
know how that goes. [EILEEN] Yeah, that’s great. I mean I love all those assignments.
They’re fantastic. [LAUREL] Thanks, yeah, like I said I would love to get those microscopes.
As he said here about five microscope, so I’m doing a scientific one where they had
to look in a microscope and really close up to something they collected outside or something
and then draw it would be amazing. That would be such a cool connection because we talked
about how, he was telling me how kids can’t draw. He was, like, we tell them to draw something
that they’re, you know, looking at in a microscope but they can’t do it. I said, oh it would
be great to, like, work on that. So, be a fun connection. [EILEEN] The pen you got.
What pen did you get? [LAUREL] 3D pens. These ones, hold on one sec. I’m going to tell you
the, let me just grab my box right here. Okay it’s pretty generic. This one just says B4
3D drawing your dream printing pen. Made by, I don’t see , it just says B4 on there. I
don’t really see a name besides that. They’re very, they’re simple looking pens. Very straight.
What’s that? [EILEEN] Are you having any trouble with them? [LAUREL] No, the only, once in
a great, I have two right now that, it’s not taking the seed anymore. So I’m going to see
if my custodians might be able to, like, take it apart and maybe fix that part hopefully,
but I had 12 total that we were sharing between two classrooms, so I had stations of about
five of them at a time, and I would kind of change them out if it got a little, but they
seemed pretty good. The problem you run into, I guess, I have different ways I got the 3D
filament. Some are kind of just little rolls that aren’t on anything but it’s a roll of
it, which is great they’ll stay the same size, but there’s some that are almost like the
spool and if it’s on a spool it gets smaller as they get to the center of the school and
then it won’t feed any more on these pens, so that’s a little bit of an issue. I’ll probably
just donate that to the tech ed department cause I know they do like a feed and they
have a 3D printer then maybe they could use that but that was one issue I ran into with
that, but overall isn’t great. I didn’t have much with them sticking or anything, so great
question though. [CINDY] I have a question, Laurel. You have kids uploading to Artsonia
their photos, and then what can answer why you’re using Artsonia for that? [LAUREL] Because
we use it anyway. That’s something we use for seventh and eighth-grade so that’s part
of what we do here so I just kind of said hey it was an easy way, it was an easy vehicle
to use to have it loaded for them already. Honestly, it’s such an earth dating such a
simple process for us. I mean you can do it in any way. [CINDY] (Unintelligible) gallery
for them?[LAUREL] Yeah, they have their own online gallery from seventh to eighth grade,
they have all their artwork for everything they’ve created, so they have a whole portfolio,
so they have all their work in there. [CINDY] What do they upload to Google Classroom? [LAUREL]
Google Classroom, I just had it so I could lay it out with the STEAM so I can really
see their connection, so we just went like I said, we’re into the computer lab for the
Google Classroom component and they could just go right from Artsonia, copy, paste it
right in, so it was very easy that transition, so it was just an easy way to pop that in
because they already have a photo, if that makes sense. It was a nice way to hold the
images so we had, like, say they had, most of them had like six or seven photos, you
know, that they had to pop into their Google Classroom and and that was the easiest way
to get to it, I thought, you know, as soon as I’m trying to figure out a way to save
it maybe and I guess they could have seeded in their Google Drives or something and then
done it, but I didn’t know how to do that, so I figured it was easier. We had Artsonia
anyway. It’s a great process. They’re used to it, so that was probably the easiest way
I figured to do that. [CINDY] Anybody else have any questions? [EILEEN] Yeah, you said
the notetaking was a problem. Do you have them ever whip up their their phone and just
take a picture and write the note later or do you think they? [LAUREL] Good idea. No
all of them have phones. I think, you know, high school you might have more. Kids do ask
me if they can do that. Can I take a photos and I always say sure, go ahead, have a photo,
but that’s not a bad idea. I think I just need to set up like a little table of each
area where they can have just some paper there that they can just jot down notes or whatever
because I do it I had little forms for them to fill out and they kind of got a little
cumbersome because there’s a staple and they had to open it to see it, so I don’t know
there’s an easier way like I said I had the PowerPoint running on the smart board so that
did help and they can we look at that too but I kind of wanted them to just jot down
those especially when they were experimenting like with the centrifugal force and the pottery
wheels and that sort of thing, so a lot of times they could remember they’re experimentation
know what they did, but I kind of wanted a little bit of a accurate description of that
but. [CINDY] What if you gave them or if you just placed piles of sticky notes at each
station. [LAUREL] That’s a good idea. That’s a really good idea. Jot that down. Sticky
notes. Yeah, that’s a really good idea. I should just do that because we have tons actually
now that you say. That we’ve hundreds of sticky notes and sacrum that we had ordered, so that’s
a great idea and then they could just jot it down and doesn’t really have to be something
that they keep so I think that’s a great way to do it because what they’ll do is they take
their notes really going to Google Classroom and that’s where they would kind of shot that
down. Awesome. Thanks for that info. Was that you, Cindy? [CINDY] Yeah. [LAUREL] Yeah, nice.
[CINDY] Yeah, I’m the (unintelligible) queen. You know that. Anybody else have any questions
out there for Laurel? Well this is great. I learned a lot. I think it’s really a great
webinar. I think once we get this archived, it’ll be available for other people who signed
up to be able to see it like this make it this afternoon. [LAUREL] Great. Yeah if they
need my contact info please send it to them, so if they have any questions of you fantastic.
Thank you all for being part of this.

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