Artist-in-Residence – Carson Street Primary School

Artist-in-Residence – Carson Street Primary School


♪ [music] ♪ – [Woman] Sensorium presents theJub
Jub Tree
, a magical, multi-sensory, theatrical experience created especially
for children with special needs. – [Roslyn] We were looking at exposing
children to theatre where the children felt very comfortable with the artists
and were able to use their different communication devices, because most
of them are non-verbal, where they are able to develop those knowledge
and understandings with the literacy and the storytelling that
was going on. – [Melinda] We wanted to expand their
language. We wanted them to initiate communication, and all this happened
when we were doing workshops with the artists and the children. – [Francis] The AIR grant allowed us
to investigate, alongside the staff and with the kids there, to see, “Well,
how much can we convey narrative?” Because for a lot of these kids a
storybook might be quite difficult, let alone visual theatre in terms
of following at something and really understanding it. – An artist coming in without knowing
our children, I think, would find it quite daunting. – At the beginning, there were…some
children don’t like touching things. Towards the end, they were
having a go. – It was very much that work, and the
outcomes of that project at the time and what we developed that really spurred
us on to become a company, a fully-fledged company. – [Michelle] I remember, actually, someone
from Disability Services Commission coming and seeing the final performance
with the kids, and saying, “I think you guys need a name.
What’s your name going to be?” And that was sort of the moment,
actually, that we came up with Sensorium. – Yeah. – Sensorium. – [Group] Listen to the drum. – We could see so many positive
benefits for our students and so much, I suppose, from the staffs’ point of view,
of looking at other ways of teaching. – For me, to work with Michelle who
was into the drama bit, that, I found inspiring. So, from a teacher’s
perspective, I was also so heavily involved in trying to improve
my skills with the kids. – [Tiffany] I mean, it’s brilliant,
as a teacher and as educators, that you feel like you’ve progressed.
Well, they’ve developed and they’ve progressed in their learning, and also
they’re participating and they’ve gotten a little piece of something from it. – Was it was a rooster. – Me? Not me. – Who ripped the leaves from the
Jub Jub Tree? – What the AIR grant allowed us to do
was to really look at, “How much can we convey using sensory stimuli as access
points?” So, in theJub Jub Tree, the example we often use is it’s integral
to the story of theJub Jub Tree, the magic Jub Jub Tree, which eventually
bears marshmallow fruits at the end of the show that all the kids get to eat.
It’s important that the kids understand that when it rains in the story, the tree
starts to grow. And so, in the story, when it rains, the kids actually,
physically get wet. So, it’s really about sign-posting
stuff like that. – As well as hearing it. – Hearing the rain. There’s a song
about the rain, but there’s lots of different sensory access points in. ♪ [music] ♪ – Well, for me, I can see that it gave
them some sort of hope and some sort of light, and then gave those
children the opportunity to be included in something. – [John] The way it all worked
out with the artists was quite spectacular from my point of view. I don’t think I’ve
seen a program like that in all my years. They definitely, definitely inspire
a classroom teacher. – Our students have, you know, all of the
subsequent students that have come through, have continued to have
that joy and magic of working with such a wonderful group of theatre. – And on that final day, it was just
wonderful to see the kids engaged, you know, smiles, confident. – Alongside that, we also had people
from the disability world coming there and affirming, “Yes, there is a
need for this.” ♪ [music] ♪

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